Part 8 of 20: HubSpot Sales Statistics…With Secret Sauce Added

# 8  65% of sales reps can’t find content to send to prospects

Communication between sales and marketing is so important—it’s a main component of sales enablement. Marketing templates and documents need to be easily accessible and customizable.

Salespeople  Effective-Business-Communication-1
I listen to salespeople who regularly show their resistance to ongoing communication with prospects and clients as “What am I going to say or send them? The marketing department manages email blasts….” In a time when retail showrooms need to generate 30% of their revenue through outreach actions (versus waiting for the door to swing or the phone to ring), this IS an area that can use assistance from the marketing department about how to construct communications that align with the company message, graphics and images that need to be consistent with the aesthetic and language of the company, follow up communication templates that support showroom promotions or services. And these actions need to be taught…they fall prey to being directed without training, and then are expected to be executed but don’t happen.

Sales Managers
In short, what I mentioned about salespeople needs to be managed by their sales manager. BE the assistance they need in creation and execution. They really don’t know how to do this  – they aren’t just being resistant or lazy. Help them be good at an area they weren’t originally hired to do.

oxo,

Jody

Jody Smiling Photo copy

“Their hand on the front door”

  For sales professionals, everywhere.   One of my very favorite top producing salespeople worked for Star Furniture in Houston for years. When she first arrived there, she leap-frogged over the longstanding #1 salesperson and never looked back. As I am always … Continue reading

Make the Simple Sound Simple

For sales professionals, everywhere.
 
I have the good fortune of working with several tile showrooms. The process of buying and selling hard surfaces is a bit different from selling furniture and lighting, but not that different. They are still retail sales interactions and sales interactions involving designers or contractors…so more similar than different.
As happens in lighting, the more complicated the product, the more complicated the salespeople are apt to make the interaction and conversation – thinking they need to talk simpleon and on about the product, either to try to communicate its value at that price or to establish confidence with the buyer. In both cases, talking too much is just talking too much.
What occurred to me in a call last week was how salespeople can make simple sound simple. Let’s say the retail customer came in looking for tile for a backsplash. A single product and a permanent application, so the stakes might seem high, but they really aren’t. The salesperson could say something at the outset of the conversation, like: “Thanks for considering us…we do these projects every day..they are pretty simple and here’s what tends to happen. Do you have a measurement of the space and a sample of the countertop?” (if yes, great, continue. If no, say, “Good…we will find a couple of tiles you like and make this work”). To continue with HOW the process works: “Today, we will select a couple of tiles that you like, you will take them home and see how they look in the morning and at night and with your countertop, and before you leave we will schedule a time for you to come back. You will be able to confirm the measurements and which tile you prefer. When you come back, we can place the order. It’s simple and we like to keep it that way.”
Will this work exactly like this every time? No. Does it need to? No. What it will do is keep the simple simple…and not complicate what is not a complicated process. Try it and let me know what happens.
(And yes, I know that the salesperson can also sketch the space and change the countertop and the floor tile…that’s for another blog. 😉)
Now, go sell something.
oxo,
Jody
Jody Smiling Photo copy