Featured Designer (September 2013): Tylor Devereaux

September 2013

Featured designer: Tylor Devereaux
Grand Rapids, MI | http://www.tdinteriordesign.com/

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I had the pleasure of meeting Tylor Devereaux a few years ago when I was speaking at the Michigan Design Center.  The connection was instant.  I was drawn to his personality, his humor, his direct style of communicating, and his inquisitiveness and willingness to take a look at how he was running his design practice.  And while his business was good, he was looking for opportunities to take it to the next level.  We worked together for a few months and made some structural changes that improved several aspects of his business.  He has since gone on to be a contestant on HGTV and continues to thrive as a designer.  I’m delighted that he’s our Featured Designer for this month!

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1.  What are the biggest changes you have seen to the industry and to your business in the last 5 years?

The biggest changes I have seen in the last five years:  Two thoughts: Dolly-decorators have pretty much faded into the sunset- THANK GOODNESS!  The pros survived the fluctuation in the economy and the rest have been weeded out.  Second-clients shopping on the internet.  To a client, a sofa on blahblah.com may look great, but without the knowledge and experience of the designer-they can really be lead in a bad direction.  Both help to strengthen our interior design profession and I absolutely love that.

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2.  What have you done in your business to respond to those changes – and how is that working for you?

Proving to clients that professionalism in the design field is key to a great working relationship.  Letter of agreement is always signed, standing by fee structure, being honest, fair and consistent with my clients.

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3.  What do you predict for the future of the interior design industry – and how can designers prepare for that?

No matter what the future holds, we as interior designers are in a great place.  Talent, honesty and enthusiasm will always reign in our industry-anything else is just fluff and puff.  Clients crave a wonderful experience, end results they can be proud of and to feel that we worth the investment.

https://sellinginteriordesign.com/designer-series/

Designer Series: Corey Damen Jenkins

November 1, 2012

Featured designer: Corey Damen Jenkins
Bloomfield Hills, MI | http://www.coreydamenjenkins.com/

I first met Corey in 2010 at the Michigan Design Center where I was speaking on “Pricing Design.” Corey sat in the first row, beautifully dressed and with a bright smile, his portfolio in one hand and a pad and pen for note taking in the other. He came prepared to get as much as he could from an ‘expert from afar’ as he developed his then fledgling design business. His questions were thoughtful and on target for someone early in his design career and appropriate for where the industry was at that time. He was his as ever gracious and charming self, poised to be noticed nationally. Since then he has become an HGTV celebrity designer, grown his business and studio to incorporate more designers and support people at a time when other designers are cutting back, and the future is blazing for him. We have developed a lovely friendship and I am proud and delighted that he chose to participate in the Designer Series, further evidence of his generous nature and his commitment and contribution to the industry.

1. What are the biggest changes you have seen to the industry and to your business in the last 5 years?
Answer: One thing is the huge proliferation of clients making efforts to “shop” products by using the internet or competing showrooms against the interior designers. Also, fabric houses seem to be discontinuing lines far more frequently and keeping even less material in stock.

2. What have you done in your business to respond to those changes – and how is that working for you?
Answer: We’ve placed a clause requiring initialing at the time of contract signing that specifies that any product we source is subject to a steep (and threatening) 25% referral fee should the client decide to source said products independently of the firm. It has been very effective when they realize that any savings they hope to get are in effect eaten up by our referral fee. Our contract also says that we are responsible for 100% of the selection and procurement process.

In terms of dealing with constant production drops at the fabric mills, I’ve found that I have selected 1 or even 2 additional “back-ups” for many of my design packages just in case a favorite option is dropped from production. It’s been a little more work, but at least doing so prevents scrambling later. Another key has been to put friendly “pressure” on the client to commit to purchases quickly as timing is of the essence. I tell them that if they “LOVE” what they see on my presentation boards, they need to bust a move quickly because someone else in the country is likely “loving it too” and may buy it out from under us. This seems to put the “fear of the design gods” into them and a fire under their fannies for action.

3. What do you predict for the future of the interior design industry – and how can designers prepare for that?
Answer: I predict that consumers will become even more savvy with the internet, getting tax exemption IDs, and other tools to under-cut designers’ commissions. Designers need to protect themselves with their contracts. They also need to embrace technology and wield it as a tool in protecting their creative vision. Finally, designers may need to move away from certain items i.e. decorative lighting options where SKUs and costs are common knowledge on the internet, and seek out pieces that cannot be shopped, i.e. antiques. This will protect their sales as well as give their project a more unique look.

https://sellinginteriordesign.com/designer-series/